DC Residents Cast First Presidential Votes On This Day in 1964

On November 3, 1964, residents of the District of Columbia cast their ballots in a presidential election for the first time.

The 23rd Amendment, ratified in March 1961, gave citizens of the nation’s capital the right to vote for president and vice president. The amendment reads –

SECTION 1

The District constituting the seat of Government of the United States shall appoint in such manner as Congress may direct:

A number of electors of President and Vice President equal to the whole number of Senators and Representatives in Congress to which the District would be entitled if it were a State, but in no event more than the least populous State; they shall be in addition to those appointed by the States, but they shall be considered, for the purposes of the election of President and Vice President, to be electors appointed by a State; and they shall meet in the District and perform such duties as provided by the twelfth article of amendment.

SECTION 2

The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Washington, DC has three electoral votes, but only one non-voting delegates in the House of Representatives. The Washington D.C., Statehood Referendum is on the ballot this year.

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